The Yachting Club Cocktail

Yes, but which Yachting Club? Or is this drink applicable to any Yachting Club? What about Yacht Clubs? Sadly, these will forever be among the unanswered mysteries of life. What we can answer is that this drink first appeared in Hugo Ensslin’s 1917 book Recipes for Mixed Drinks. Actually, no, I can’t even say that for…

The Rah-Rah-Rut Cocktail

Normally I don’t much care for absinthe as an ingredient in mixed drinks, although I love the stuff on its own. Looking at this one in Hugo Ensslin’s 1917 book Recipes for Mixed Drinks made me hopeful, though, as it seemed like the quantity of absinthe would lend something nice without overpowering the drink with anise notes.…

The MacLean Cocktail

From A.S. Craddock’s The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book (1935) comes this drink, named after one John MacLean, “long proprietor of the Cincinnati Enquirer and the Washington Post.” Maybe dude was really tall, but I think Craddock means he owned those papers for some time. Ah, the vagaries of language. Anyhoo. This is yet another take on perhaps that most…

The Honolulu Cocktail

Hugo Ensslin’s 1917 book Recipes for Mixed Drinks lists one version of the Honolulu Cocktail, and his is the recipe we’ll be featuring here. The Savoy Cocktail Book of 1930 lists two versions, one of which is identical to Ensslin’s. Meanwhile, The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book, from 1935, features, under “Pre-Prohibition Cocktails,” three different versions, none of which match either…

The Rob Roy and the Rory O’More

These two cocktails (the Rob Roy quite well-known, the Rory O’More less so) are basically variants of the Manhattan, using, respectively, Scotch and Irish whiskies, albeit variations using the no-longer-in-favor 1:1 ratio of whiskey to vermouth. The Rob Roy, presumably, is the older of the drinks, while the Rory O’More’s name was probably chosen to…